Featured

Featured

  • 'Invest in love,' pope says on first World Day of the Poor

    VATICAN CITY (CNS) -- People have a basic choice in the way they live: either striving to build up treasures on earth or giving to others in order to gain heaven, Pope Francis said. "What we invest in love remains, the rest vanishes," the pope said ...

    More
  • Who was Albino Luciani, the 'smiling Pope'?

    Vatican City, Nov 17, 2017 CNA/EWTN News.- Last week Albino Luciani, better known by his papal name, John Paul I, took the next step on the path to sainthood. Yet apart from the fame garnered by various theories that sprouted due to the enigmatic nature ...

    More
  • Bishop Dewane disappointed by House passage of tax cut bill

    WASHINGTON (CNS) -- The chairman of a U.S. bishops' committee concerned with domestic justice issues expressed disappointment over the House of Representatives' passage of "the deeply flawed" tax cut bill. House members "ignored impacts to the poor ...

    More
   
Latest News

Faithful from near and far gather to celebrate Fr. Solanus, friend and healer


Detroit, Mich., Nov 19, 2017 CNA/EWTN News.- Usually, when Detroit’s Ford Field is filled with people, it’s because football fans are watching the Lions play another NFL team. But on Saturday, Nov. 18, despite the chill and the rain, more than 60,000 people from around the country filled the domed stadium for another reason - to celebrate the beatification of their friend Father Solanus Casey, who is now just one step away from canonization as a saint in the Catholic Church.

Read more

'Invest in love,' pope says on first World Day of the Poor


VATICAN CITY (CNS) -- People have a basic choice in the way they live: either striving to build up treasures on earth or giving to others in order to gain heaven, Pope Francis said. "What we invest in love remains, the rest vanishes," the pope said in his homily Nov. 19, the first World Day of the Poor.

Read more

Notre Dame allows third-party coverage of contraceptives in health plans


NOTRE DAME, Ind. (CNS) -- Questions and confusion continue to swirl around the University of Notre Dame's decision to allow the third-party administrators of its health plans to go on providing morally objectionable services to university employees, even though Notre Dame no longer is required by the government to do so.

Read more
Local News
Photo Galleries
Opinion
View all
Movie Reviews