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  • Crazy Rich Asians

    NEW YORK (CNS) -- The award for the most accurate film title of the year goes to "Crazy Rich Asians" (Warner Bros), a romantic comedy about, well, members of a certain ethnic group who are insanely wealthy.

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  • Alpha

    NEW YORK (CNS) -- The oft-repeated tale of a boy and his dog is as old as time -- or at least the last Ice Age, the intriguing setting for "Alpha" (Columbia). Director Albert Hughes, working from his own story, imagines how mankind discovered man's best friend -- its canine ancestor, the wolf -- some 20,000 years ago in southern Europe. He immerses the viewer in an extraordinarily vivid tableau, a primeval world where Cro-Magnon families struggled to survive against apocalyptic weather and savage creatures.

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  • Slender Man

    NEW YORK (CNS) -- The plot of "Slender Man" (Screen Gems) is concisely summed up when Wren (Joey King), one of the creature's victims, screams, "He gets in your head like a computer virus!" Yeah, that's his entire reason for being, in fact. There's not a whole lot else to this horror movie based on the tall, faceless character in a dark suit introduced by his creator, Eric Knudsen, on the internet in 2009.

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  • The Meg

    NEW YORK (CNS) -- Forty-three summers ago (incredibly), Steven Spielberg's "Jaws" made moviegoers afraid to go in the ocean, for fear of getting bitten (or worse) by a great white shark. That trailblazing horror film is child's play compared to "The Meg" (Warner Bros.). Consider "Jaws" crossed with another Spielberg classic, "Jurassic Park," and you'll get the (very big) picture.

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  • Dog Days

    NEW YORK (CNS) -- Written by Elissa Matsueda and Erica Oyama and directed by Ken Marino, the new comedy "Dog Days" (LD Entertainment) is comprised of a number of vignettes, following a variety of Los Angeles residents as they navigate life through a summer of challenges. Helping them in their times of need are their loving canine companions.

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  • Christopher Robin

    NEW YORK (CNS) -- It's always dangerous to tamper with perfection. And, if there were ever a perfect world, it must be that of the Winnie the Pooh literature created by author A.A. Milne and illustrator E.H. Shepard in the 1920s.

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  • The Darkest Minds

    NEW YORK (CNS) -- A strong sense of deja vu hovers over "The Darkest Minds" (Fox), a dystopian thriller about gifted teens running for their lives. Echoes of other sci-fi series abound in Chad Hodge's script (based on Alexandra Bracken's best-selling novel), from "X-Men" and "The Hunger Games" to "Divergent" and "The Maze Runner."

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  • The Spy Who Dumped Me

    NEW YORK (CNS) -- Given its blend of genres, director and co-writer Susanna Fogel's fish-out-of-water action comedy "The Spy Who Dumped Me" (Lionsgate) is surprisingly violent. Add some tawdry visuals and dialogue and the appropriate audience for the film, which has a few bright moments but eventually wears out its welcome, dwindles.

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  • Teen Titans Go! To the Movies

    NEW YORK (CNS) -- Though a mixed bag of good values and a bit of dodgy humor renders it acceptable but not ideal for kids, sharp satire makes the witty animated comedy "Teen Titans Go! To the Movies" (Warner Bros.) a hoot for their elders.

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  • Mission: Impossible -- Fallout

    NEW YORK (CNS) -- Tom Cruise's by-now iconic American agent Ethan Hunt is at the top of his game in the engrossing espionage sequel "Mission: Impossible -- Fallout" (Paramount). Despite extensive, though mostly restrained, action and the eventual showcasing of Hunt's fraught marital situation, at least some parents may deem this thrill ride of a film acceptable for older teens.

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  • Mamma Mia: Here We Go Again

    NEW YORK (CNS) -- The exuberant kitsch that was the trademark of the Swedish band Abba lives on in the musical romance "Mamma Mia: Here We Go Again" (Universal). Like its predecessor, the 2008 adaptation of the Broadway hit "Mamma Mia," the film, which serves as both a prequel and a sequel, is entirely designed to showcase the group's songs. And it could be either celebrated or dismissed as no more than a bit of glitzy fun were it not for the fact that the sexual morals on display are as tacky as the score.

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  • Unfriended: Dark Web

    NEW YORK (CNS) -- Computer hackers are sometimes just like the slashers of 1980s horror films, "Unfriended: Dark Web" (BH Tilt) shows us. This sequel to the 2015 original relies on the cherished formula of a group of well-meaning, yet feckless, young people making earnestly bad decisions -- especially those twin time-honored choices, not to involve law enforcement and not to get out of the house when a murderer is running rampant.

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  • The Equalizer 2

    NEW YORK (CNS) -- Reprising his role as dispenser of do-it-yourself justice Robert McCall, Denzel Washington once again imagines that vengeance is his in "The Equalizer 2" (Columbia). Neither Washington's gifts nor the good his character sometimes achieves compensate for the gruesome mayhem that results -- or for the skewed values underlying returning screenwriter Richard Wenk's script.

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  • Skyscraper

    NEW YORK (CNS) -- Way back in 1958, James Stewart's character struggled with vertigo in the Alfred Hitchcock movie of the same name. But he had it easy compared to Dwayne Johnson's ex-U.S. military security expert Will Sawyer in "Skyscraper" (Universal).

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  • Hotel Transylvania 3: Summer Vacation

    NEW YORK (CNS) -- Like the excursion around which it's built, the animated kids' comedy "Hotel Transylvania 3: Summer Vacation" (Sony) makes for a pleasant diversion. If it's more likely to satisfy little ones than grown-ups, director and co-writer (with Michael McCullers) Genndy Tartakovsky's cartoon is at least free of any genuinely objectionable ingredients.

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