Home » Movies
  • You Were Never Really Here

    NEW YORK (CNS) -- Whatever point there might be to "You Were Never Really Here" (Amazon), this adaptation of the Jonathan Ames novella about a stressed-out, self-loathing hitman from writer-director Lynne Ramsay is adrift in a lurid quagmire of immorality.

    Read more
  • I Feel Pretty

    NEW YORK (CNS) -- Whacks to the noggin make such convenient plot devices. In "I Feel Pretty" (STX), the latest Amy Schumer comedy, a tumble during a Soul Cycle workout gives her out-of-shape character the reverse of body dysmorphic disorder. Thus she sees herself as slim, beautiful and perfect -- and this supercharges her self-esteem, transforming her romantic life and her career.

    Read more
  • The Devil and Father Amorth

    NEW YORK (CNS) -- In this age of media saturation, there can't be many human activities that have yet to be captured on film or videotape. According to William Friedkin, director and narrator of "The Devil and Father Amorth" (The Orchard), however, his brief, mostly straightforward documentary includes just such a novelty: the first authorized footage of a Catholic exorcism.

    Read more
  • Rampage

    NEW YORK (CNS) -- Those looking for a film that seriously engages with the human condition or advances the art of cinema will not find what they're looking for in "Rampage" (Warner Bros.). Grown-ups out to kill the better part of two hours and willing to be satisfied with some campy fun, on the other hand, will have little cause for complaint.

    Read more
  • Beirut

    NEW YORK (CNS) -- Every word matters in "Beirut" (Bleecker Street), an espionage thriller set in 1982 during the Lebanese civil war. Negotiations are layered on top of promises and betrayals as American diplomats hope to exchange a hostage for a Palestinian terrorist who might be a prisoner in Israel. This is the extraordinarily rare intricately plotted drama for grown-ups in which gunfire, explosions and ethnic hatreds are secondary to matters of trust.

    Read more
  • Blumhouse's Truth or Dare

    NEW YORK (CNS) -- There's little authenticity or audacity to be found in the dull thriller "Blumhouse's Truth or Dare" (Universal). Rather than chilling viewers, director and co-writer Jeff Wadlow's film merely succeeds in endangering its cast via a supernatural version of the titular pastime. The movie thus constitutes a sort of safe, bourgeois take on the sadistic "Saw" franchise.

    Read more
  • Isle of Dogs

    NEW YORK (CNS) -- Writer-director Wes Anderson's "Isle of Dogs" (Fox Searchlight) pushes the limits of his customary deadpan drollery with its emphasis on death and gloom. Cute and cuddly these canines are not. So Anderson's first stop-motion animated film since 2009's "Fantastic Mr. Fox" is definitely not for young children.

    Read more
  • Sgt. Stubby: An American Hero

    NEW YORK (CNS) -- Any animal who manages to become an honorary noncommissioned officer in the Army must have a story worth telling. And so it proves with the generally endearing animated slice of history "Sgt. Stubby: An American Hero" (Fun Academy).

    Read more
  • The Heart of Nuba

    NEW YORK (CNS) -- "The Heart of Nuba" (Abramorama), an uplifting documentary directed by Kenneth Carlson and executive produced by Maria Shriver, tells a story that is, by turns, wonderful and horrifying.

    Read more
  • Chappaquiddick

    NEW YORK (CNS) -- On July 18, 1969, commander Neil Armstrong and his crew were hurtling toward the moon aboard Apollo 11 and Sen. Edward M. (Ted) Kennedy of Massachusetts seemed to be running on the inside track in the race for the Democratic Party's presidential nomination in 1972.

    Read more
  • Summer in the Forest

    NEW YORK (CNS) -- The documentary "Summer in the Forest" (Abramorama) is filmmaker Randall Wright's gentle, loving portrait of a man with those same qualities, Canadian advocate for the developmentally disabled Jean Vanier.

    Read more
  • Blockers

    NEW YORK (CNS) -- Contemporary society's misguided outlook on sex, from which all regard for the Gospel virtue of chastity has seemingly been banished, permeates the low comedy "Blockers" (Universal). The result is a morass of bad morals.

    Read more
  • A Quiet Place

    NEW YORK (CNS) -- The compact, stylish horror film "A Quiet Place" (Paramount) might be a parable about resisting tyranny. Taken strictly on its surface, it's a story about how strong, trusting family ties can overcome any obstacle -- especially if the members of the clan in question are as technically adept as TV's MacGyver.

    Read more
  • The Miracle Season

    NEW YORK (CNS) -- Make sure you have your tissues handy when you go to see "The Miracle Season" (Mirror). As he did with 2011's "Soul Surfer," director Sean McNamara once again brings a tragic, but ultimately inspiring, fact-based sports story to the big screen in a film parents and older children can enjoy together.

    Read more
  • Acrimony

    NEW YORK (CNS) -- Writer-director Tyler Perry pulls out all the stops in the lurid drama "Acrimony" (Lionsgate). Since his treatment of sexuality is as unbridled as all the other aspects of his film, this initially wild, ultimately over-the-top tale has a small appropriate audience.

    Read more
  • God's Not Dead: A Light in Darkness

    NEW YORK (CNS) -- Atheism is set at defiance once more in the franchise-extending drama "God's Not Dead: A Light in Darkness" (Pure Flix). Writer-director Michael Mason's film, the second sequel to 2014's "God's Not Dead," benefits from a less strident tone than its predecessors as well as a timely message about the dangers of intemperate political and cultural discourse.

    Read more
  • Ready Player One

    NEW YORK (CNS) -- Those who may have wondered what it would be like to be a pinball crashing around inside a machine amid flashing lights and ear-splitting sounds will find that experience approximated in the sci-fi fantasy "Ready Player One" (Warner Bros).

    Read more
  • Sherlock Gnomes

    NEW YORK (CNS) -- Fans of 2011's "Gnomeo and Juliet" may be pleased to discover that James McAvoy and Emily Blunt reprise their voice work as that film's title players in the animated adventure "Sherlock Gnomes" (Paramount).

    Read more
  • Midnight Sun

    NEW YORK (CNS) -- More than four centuries have passed since William Shakespeare wrote the mother of all love stories, "Romeo and Juliet." Since then, there have been countless variations on his tale of teenage star-crossed lovers.

    Read more
  • Paul, Apostle of Christ

    NEW YORK (CNS) -- In the long history of the church, perhaps no partnership has been more consequential than that between St. Paul the Apostle and his disciple, St. Luke. Between them, they account for at least 15 of the 27 books of the New Testament, and Luke accompanied Paul on some of the journeys during which the Apostle to the Gentiles sowed the seeds of faith across the Roman Empire.

    Read more
  • Pacific Rim Uprising

    NEW YORK (CNS) -- Just when you thought it was safe to take a peaceful stroll through downtown, Godzilla's mechanical distant cousins return with a vengeance in "Pacific Rim Uprising" (Universal), a noisy, violent, and utterly ridiculous sci-fi adventure.

    Read more
  • Unsane

    NEW YORK (CNS) -- The "trapped in a mental asylum" suspense genre hasn't been trotted out much in recent years. "Unsane" (Bleecker Street) shows us why. Sawyer (Claire Foy), a financial analyst in Philadelphia who suffers from mental health issues as a result of having been stalked at a previous job, visits a psychiatric facility to speak to a counselor. Unbeknownst to her, she's at one of a chain of predatory centers that, at the mere mention of suicidal thoughts, involuntarily commit patients for at least seven days in order to collect insurance fees.

    Read more
  • 7 Days in Entebbe

    NEW YORK (CNS) -- All the tension of a daring military raid has somehow been drained from "7 Days in Entebbe" (Focus). Based on the 1976 Israeli commando mission that rescued more than 100 hostages from Entebbe Airport in Uganda, the film is the fourth dramatization of that fateful week. It attempts to give a sympathetic gloss to two German leftists who planned the hijacking of an Air France flight -- Wilfried Boese (Daniel Bruhl) and Brigitte Kuhlmann (Rosamund Pike).

    Read more
  • Love, Simon

    NEW YORK (CNS) -- Good-hearted and well-crafted, but morally misguided, the gay-themed romantic comedy "Love, Simon" (Fox) is deserving of careful analysis rather than off-hand dismissal. Though its conclusion veers into crowd-pleasing propaganda, the film mostly promotes values that, if disentangled from the widespread notion that all consensual desires are to be satisfied, viewers of faith might appreciate.

    Read more
  • Tomb Raider

    NEW YORK (CNS) -- Way back when, while the century was yet young, Angelina Jolie brought a familiar figure from the world of video games to life in 2001's critically panned but financially successful "Lara Croft: Tomb Raider" and 2003's better reviewed but less lucrative "Lara Croft Tomb Raider: The Cradle of Life."

    Read more
  • I Can Only Imagine

    NEW YORK (CNS) -- Dennis Quaid brings his formidable talent to bear in the faith-driven drama "I Can Only Imagine" (Lionsgate). His portrayal of Arthur Millard, the abusive father whose conversion to evangelical Christianity inspired his son, Bart (John Michael Finley), to write the eponymous 2001 song -- an unprecedented chart topper that became popular even with nonbelievers -- represents the film's principal asset.

    Read more
  • The Hurricane Heist

    NEW YORK (CNS) -- It's fixin' to rain in the "The Hurricane Heist" (Entertainment Studios). This serviceable mash-up of the apocalyptic weather event and crime caper genres is as shallow as a puddle.

    Read more
  • Gringo

    NEW YORK (CNS) -- Moral dilemmas come fast and furious in "Gringo" (STX), a dark, but somehow not cynical, comedy about avarice and its near-instant consequences. Although this is not family fare, adult viewers who enjoy interlocking subplots -- they're piled almost too high -- quirky dialogue and car chases can get their fill here. Had this been made more elegantly, director Nash Edgerton and screenwriters Anthony Tambakis and Matthew Stone might have ended up with an Alfred Hitchcock suspense homage.

    Read more
  • The Strangers: Prey at Night

    NEW YORK (CNS) -- Random murder is the order of the day in the sadistic horror flick "The Strangers: Prey at Night" (Aviron). Director Johannes Roberts' sequel to 2008's "The Strangers" shows none of the relative restraint of the original -- which only opened the floodgates of blood as the action reached its wrap-up. Instead, the new film waxes gruesome and gory almost from the start.

    Read more